ACADA

Friday, 15 February 2013

Did GOLDIE die of Pulmonary Embolism? Cause/Symptoms/Prevention/Cure



Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blockage of the main artery of the lung or one of its branches by a substance that has travelled from elsewhere in the body through the bloodstream (embolism). PE most commonly results from deep vein thrombosis (a blood clot in the deep veins of the legs or pelvis) that breaks off and migrates to the lung, a process termed venous thromboembolism (VTE). A small proportion of cases are due to the embolization of air, fat, talc in drugs of intravenous drug abusers or amniotic fluid. The obstruction of the blood flow through the lungs and the resultant pressure on the right ventricle of the heart lead to the symptoms and signs of PE. The risk of PE is increased in various situations, such as cancer or prolonged bed rest.  

What is pulmonary embolism?
Pulmonary embolism is the sudden blockage of a major blood vessel (artery) in the lung, usually by a blood clot. In most cases, the clots are small and are not deadly, but they can damage the lung. But if the clot is large a
nd stops blood flow to the lung, it can be deadly. Quick treatment could save your life or reduce the risk of future problems.

What are the symptoms?
The most common symptoms are:
Sudden shortness of breath.
Sharp chest pain that is worse when you cough or take a deep breath.
A cough that brings up pink, foamy mucus.
Pulmonary embolism can also cause more general symptoms. For example, you may feel anxious or on edge, sweat a lot, feel lightheaded or faint, or have a fast heart rate or palpitations.
If you have symptoms like these, you need to see a doctor right away, especially if they are sudden and severe.In most cases, pulmonary embolism is caused by a blood clot in the leg that breaks loose and travels to the lungs. A blood clot in a vein close to the skin is not likely to cause problems. But having blood clots in deep veins (deep vein thrombosis) can lead to pulmonary embolism. More than 300,000 people each year have deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism.
Other things can block an artery, such as tumors, air bubbles, amniotic fluid, or fat that is released into the blood vessels when a bone is broken. But these are rare.
What increases your risk of pulmonary embolism?
Anything that makes you more likely to form blood clots increases your risk of pulmonary embolism. Some people are born with blood that clots too quickly. Other Things that can increase your risk include:
Being inactive for long periods. This can happen when you have to stay in bed after surgery or a serious illness, or when you sit for a long time on a flight or car trip.


How can you prevent DVT from travel?

During a trip of 4 or more hours:
·         Get up and walk around every half hour to an hour. When in a car, stop and walk around every hour or so.
·         While you're sitting, raise and lower your toes, keeping your heels on the floor. Then raise and lower your heels, keeping your toes on the floor. Do this every 20 minutes.
·         Drink extra fluids. Avoid alcohol and caffeine.
·         Wear loose-fitting clothes that aren't tight around your waist or your legs.
If you already have a risk of blood clots, talk to your doctor before taking a long trip. Your doctor may want you to wear compression stockings or take blood-thinning medicine.

When to call a doctor

For a few weeks after a long flight or trip, be alert for signs of a blood clot. A DVT needs treatment right away.
Call 911 or other emergency services if you:
·         Suddenly have shortness of breath and/or chest pain. Chest pain from a blood clot that travels to the lungs (pulmonary embolism) often gets worse with deep breathing.
·         Faint or lose consciousness.
Call your doctor right away if you have:
·         Swelling, warmth, or tenderness in the soft tissues of your leg.
·         Pain in your leg that gets worse when you stand or walk. This is especially important if there is also swelling or redness in your leg.


Treatment
Anticoagulant therapy is typically the mainstay of treatment. Acutely, supportive treatments, such as oxygen or analgesia, may be required. People are often admitted to hospital in the early stages of treatment, and tend to remain under inpatient care until the INR has reached therapeutic levels. Increasingly, however low-risk cases are managed at home in a fashion already common in the treatment of DVT.

3 comments:

  1. Thank you somuch. Seyi for dis info;lot of us need to hv proper health check-up tym-tym .... Probably Goldie dint chk wif her doc before travelling..RIP Susan...aka Goldie

    ReplyDelete
  2. Life saving information!thanks

    ReplyDelete
  3. Tanx 4dat info. Guess we have to be seeing our doctor 4 a routine check-up

    ReplyDelete